Health Consequences

If you need a reminder of how bad smoking is for you, here it is.

Most smokers will tell you they’ve always known WHY they should quit; what they don't know is HOW to quit smoking. But if the grim facts help you stay committed to quitting smoking, here are some of the statistics:

ONE HALF of lifelong smokers will die of a tobacco-related disease.

Smoking cigarettes is so deadly that every 6.5 seconds, someone in the world dies from a tobacco-related illness. That’s about 1,200 deaths per day and more than 440,000 a year in the U.S. alone — all from tobacco use.

Cigarette smoke contains 4,000 chemicals: hydrogen cyanide, formaldehyde, arsenic, ammonia and urea among them.

And if you’re a pregnant smoker, many of these chemicals are making their way to your baby. You’re not only harming yourself but your baby, too. Smoking while pregnant puts your baby at risk for premature delivery, low birth weight, childhood asthma and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.

Chemotherapy and radiation therapy patients who keep smoking/using tobacco don’t respond as well to treatment and may have worse side effects than those who stop their tobacco use.  To get the most out of your treatment, stop using tobacco.

Cigarettes are also one of the top risk factors for developing complications after surgery. Smoking compromises wound healing, increases surgical site infections, makes anesthesia more dangerous and raises the risk of severe pulmonary complications. In fact, many surgeons insist patients stop smoking for at least two weeks before an operation.

One final note: The poisons taken into the smoker’s body wreak havoc and cause illness in a number of ways. If you need a reminder of all the illnesses you risk giving yourself by smoking, take a look at the list below from the government’s Centers for Disease Control.

  • Lung Cancer
  • Coronary Heart Disease
  • Laryngeal Cancer
  • Oral Cavity and Pharyngeal Cancers
  • Acute Respiratory Illnesses
  • Chronic Respiratory Diseases
  • Emphysema
  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Bladder and Kidney Cancers
  • Stomach Cancer
  • Colorectal Cancer
  • Prostate Cancer
  • Acute Leukemia
  • Liver Cancer
  • Cervical Cancer
  • Esophageal Cancer
  • Cerebrovascular Disease
  • Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm
  • Fertility Problems
  • Pregnancy Problems
  • Loss of Bone Mass and the Risk of Fractures
  • Erectile Dysfunction
  • Peptic Ulcer Disease

It’s a long, bad list, isn’t it? For more information on the consequences of smoking cigarettes, visit the CDC’s website.

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